The Wisconsin Idea Podcast #40

Chad Alan Goldberg explains how the Wisconsin Idea led to the progressive reforms of the early 20th Century and how its renewal can revitalize democracy once again. We discuss his recent book Education for Democracy: Renewing the Wisconsin Idea.   They had an obligation to take the knowledge that they were developing, to take their expertise... Continue Reading →

Meritocratic Ideals Can Undermine Democracy

Michael Sandel describes the meritocratic ideal as a dystopian aspiration in The Tyranny of Merit. Justin Kempf reflects on this book and considers how meritocratic ambitions can undermine democratic governance. What is Justice Justice is an ideal divided between claims of inequality and equality. Philosophers as early as Plato and Aristotle defined it as what each... Continue Reading →

Polarization, Democratization, and the Arab Spring Podcast #39

Elizabeth (Liz) Nugent discusses how polarization affects the process of democratization through her experience in Tunisia and Egypt. Her recent book After Repression: How Polarization Derails Democratic Transition. Her work considers how legacies of repression create the conditions for polarization.    The focus on the individual people involved in this moment and their preexisting relationships for... Continue Reading →

Does Inequality Hinder Economic Growth?

Thomas Piketty argues economic inequality is an obstacle for economic growth in his latest book Capital and Ideology. Justin Kempf reflects on the implications of this idea as he works to develop his own ideas of economics compatible with a political theory of democracy. An Institutional Theory of Economics It has never been clear for me... Continue Reading →

Social Media and Democracy Podcast #34

Nate Persily and Josh Tucker discuss the impact of social media on democracy and share their research. Nate is a professor of law at Stanford University and a co-director at the Stanford Cyber Policy Center. Josh is a professor of Political Science at NYU and a faculty director at the Center for Social Media and... Continue Reading →

African Politics and Social Media Podcast #30

Winston Mano explains how social media has reshaped African politics. He is the principal editor of the Journal of African Media Studies and the coeditor of Social Media and Elections in Africa.        African Politics and Social Media Recent events in the United States have shown how even the most established democracies have much... Continue Reading →

History of Democracy in Germany Podcast #29

Michael Hughes explains the history of democracy in Germany. Michael is a professor of history at Wake Forest University. He discusses his most recent book Embracing Democracy in Germany: Political Citizenship and Participation, 1871-2000.       A History of Democracy in Germany The German Question haunted international relations for generations. Like China, it was... Continue Reading →

The Case for Multiparty Democracy Podcast #28

Lee Drutman joins the Democracy Paradox to make his case for multiparty democracy in the United States. Lee is a Senior Fellow in the Political Reform Program at New America. He discusses his most recent book Breaking the Two-Party Doom Loop.   Why Multiparty Democracy Madison’s Federalist 10 makes an unusual case. He argued the size... Continue Reading →

Democracy Without Elections Podcast #27

Hélène Landemore joins the Democracy Paradox to describe how democracy without elections or politicians is possible. Hélène is an associate professor at Yale University. Her research explores ways to reimagine institutions to better represent those governed and enhance their legitimacy.    Democratic Transformation The origin of the third wave of democratization is commonly dated to... Continue Reading →

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